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<<<<STANDARD OF THE WORLD

INFO HERE ABOUT "THE GREATEST CAR EVER MADE" 57-60
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58 ELDO BROUGHAM from VIC

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57 ELDO BROUGHAM

57 ELDO BROUGHAM
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SCROLL DOWN FOR MANY FACTS / INFO ABOUT THE ELDO BROUGHAM
VERY FEW MADE over the 4 years 1957-1960(TOTAL 904)

Click Here ELDO BROUGHAM HISTORY(Courtesy Caddy Data Base)

Click Here for pic of the 4 years ELDO BROUGHAM WAS MADE.

Check out a GREAT 58 ELDO BROUGHAM SITE

57 Eldo Brougham Rear/WFB pic

58 Eldorado Brougham INSIDE PART 1 From VIC

58 Edorado Brougham INSIDE PART 2, From VIC

58 ELDO BROUGHAM PICS of FRONT / BACK /Wheel Disk

SCROLL DOWN FOR A DETAILED STORY ABOUT THE ELDO BROUGHAM

Courtesy of "THE CADDY DATA BASE"

57eldobromdata2


ELDORADO BROUGHAM
                                                             By      Cadillac

As Promised two years earlier, Cadillac brought to limited production
their Eldorado Brougham Motorama dream car. The realization of a
life's long ambition for dream car designer "Harley Earl".
The hyper-luxurious Brougham was described by Cadillac management
as the most advanced auto ever built and a mirror of things to come,
the worlds newest and most exclusive auto. It is still the most complex
auto ever offered to the American public with features not yet found
on today's cars. This hand built milestone, with its timeless styling,
left no doubt in the public's mind as to who was the king of the
luxury car market.

The price for this car in 1957 was a staggering $13,500 making it
the most expensive American car ever. Even more staggering was
the $23,000 it cost Cadillac to build each one, resulting in much red ink
for Cadillac. All this in the days when you could buy the top of the
line regular Cadillac, Biarritz Convertible for $6,500 or a
Rolls Royce Saloon for about $9,000!

These chariots were typically owned by movie stars, wealthy industrialist,
a gangster or two, and the ultra wealthy. For your money, you took
delivery of the most opulently equipped car ever to come out of Detroit.
Complete with such items as a ladies compact, magnetized drinking cups,
cigarette case, lipstick holder, beveled mirror, note pad, lambskin carpet,
and a perfume atomizer filled with Arpege de Lavin, Paris. This was
strictly for those privileged few who could afford the car of the future
while living in the present.

The Brougham marked industry firsts in all sorts of technological advances and luxury:
Air Ride suspension, electronic memory seat position system,
an automatic starting mechanism which will start the car without
having to touch the key, automatic trunk opens, closes, locks and unlocks
with a touch of a button in the glovebox, and of course, there were the usual
full power assists with air conditioning. There were also many similarly unusual
features to numerous to list. The Brougham had no options, aside from colors,
which came in a wide variety. Everything was standard equipment.

This was the first and only time a concept "Dream" car from a major US
auto maker was available to the public. In 1957 and 58 only 704 stainless
steel top Eldorado Broughams were produced. This was the height of
decadence, the ultimate personal luxury car. Unsurpassed even today, it still
stands out as the best symbol of that exclusive dream in the world
of mass produced fantasy!



Copyright Mastermind Inc.

HTML> Convertible assettext

 


CADILLAC ELDORADO BROUGHAM


Imagine, if you will, a car so advanced it could start itself, a car so luxurious its doors locked themselves, a car which lowered its suspension so you could get out more easily, a car with polarized sun visors,his and hers ashtrays and electric seats with memories. Well, imagine no more, simply feast your eyes on the 1957 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham - the most expensive car in the world.

The automotive dream became reality in 1957 when General Motors' Cadillac Division introduced a new ultra-luxury range and once again entered a a rarified market it had left 17 years before. Pitched against up-market competition of the likes of Lincoln, Rolls-Royce and Bentley, the whistles-and-bells Eldorado Brougham was the car which truly put the luxury back into Cadillac.

Designed by Harley 'Mr Fins' Earl, it was derived from a concept car displayed at the 1955 GM Motorama, a travelling roadshow designed to showcase GM products. The concept car featured the suicide rear doors and pillarless lines later perfected on the '57 Eldorado Brougham. Earl's maxim was reported to be "go all the way, then back off some", which he clearly ignored with this car.

Over the top is not superlative enough to describe the technical specifications and unadulterated opulence of this grandest of Cadillacs. From stem to stern, wing-tip to wing-tip, the Brougham epitomised the fascination of American car designers with the 'jet age'. From the twin-bullet front fender to the high-cut tail-fins, this car carried a level of equipment and finish never seen in production cars before.

 

Riding on air

Our feature car is pretty select in its own right - number 212 out of 400 made under the Series 70 banner, and one of only four known in Australia. Like all '57 Cadillacs it boasts the tubular-centre X-frame chassis, enabling a significantly lower vehicle height of only 55.5 inches, enhancing the jet-fighter image.

The chassis rode on self-levelling air suspension, providing a comfortably soft, cushioned ride, and the car lowered automatically when either of the front passenger doors was opened. GM's answer to Citroen's high-pressure hydraulics was similar in feel to the French design, but far simpler.

However, the early cars' suspension often leaked, and even in perfectly maintained cars there were cases of hapless owners causing enormous damage to the underbody by neglecting to wait the necessary minute after starting up before driving off - the time needed to allow the suspension to pump up.

Accelerating this behemoth was simple enough, thanks to the 335bhp, 365cu in V8 nestling under the long bonnet where it breathed through twin 4bbl carburettors before exhausting through tuned twin pipes to outlets in the rear bumpers. Injudicious application of the right foot could invoke wheel spin, and the deep-throated roar from the exhausts may have persuaded some owners that they drove a sports car, even if the gearbox was the relatively lazy three-speed Hydra-matic. The Brougham also came fitted with a 55 amp generator, twice the size of the one found in the standard Cadillac. There is a reason for this.....

 

Slashing lines!

The sleek lines of the '57 Brougham are enhanced by aggressive detail mouldings flowing from the front wings into a jet-like air scoop in front of the rear wheels, the lower edge of which is formed by a stainless-steel sill panel, sweeping back and above the wheel arch to a wide stainless-steel moulding running into the chromed cast-alloy bumpers.

The rear of the car is almost subtle compared to the snarling, gape-mouthed, chromed cast-alloy front grille centred between the banks of twin headlights, another first for Cadillac. Aside from the slim, almost delicate rearward-pointing fins on the rear quarters, the low, gently curved boot (or decklid) folds into a deep but not outrageous split bumper, housing the tail lights and the exhaust outlets. The heat from these causes de-laminating of the chrome on the alloy bumpers, so to prevent this the owner has re-routed the tailpipes to a less damaging location, but has yet to have the bumpers re-chromed.

Stainless-steel is a major feature on the Brougham. The vent grilles below the front windscreen are stainless, as is the beautifully finished brushed stainless-steel roof, always left unpainted. Other metallic excess is there in the cast alloy wheels, so much lighter - and more expensive - than steel, the style of which is repeated in the hubcaps of the later '59 model Eldorados.

Electric everything


These days, electric windows are passˇ, but in 1957 they were still considered a luxury-car-only item. Controlled from an elegant panel on the driver's door, there are buttons for the four door windows, and two extra buttons for the ventipanes (that's quarter windows to us non-Americans).

The centre-opening doors swing on ball-bearing hinges and lock electrically and automatically when the gear selector is moved into Drive. Conversely, should a rear door be open, the gear selector will not engage any gears in the Drive range. The doors can also be locked by pressing the small button in the centre of the door latch.

Electric, too, is the seat adjustment, with controls for fore-and-aft and height, but not only that, this Cadillac has a feature which is not even common on cars today - seat 'memory' positions for two different drivers, set by twiddling the control knobs on the driver's door armrest. Another interesting feature of the seat controls is that they lower automatically when the door is opened, returning to the pre-set position when the door is closed and the ignition switched on.

If all of that doesn't impress the you, how about the electric self-starter? When the gear lever is in Neutral or Drive and the ignition is turned to the On position, the car starts itself! If extra cranking is required, say in cold weather or after flooding the engine, turning the key another notch over-rides the auto-starter so that it starts like any other car. Imagine being able to start the engine with a remote control, you can't even do that today, 40 years later!

Our 1957 owner could also cruise into the drive-through at the shopping mall, roll down the window, and direct the attendant to place the weekly groceries in the boot. A quick reach into the glovebox to activate the electric lock and motor-drive for the bootlid, both opening and closing, and one might almost never have to leave the car.

Another unusual feature of the '57 Brougham is the 'Autronic Eye', a small black plastic fitting on the dashboard near the driver. It is basically a light sensor, which detects the high beam of oncoming traffic at night, and electronically dips the car's headlights. A manual override switch allows the driver to flash inconsiderate drivers who don't take the hint! Or they could choose to give them give them a blast on the triple 'sea-shell and trumpet' airhorns as they go past. No such thing as 'road rage' legislation back then!

Opulent interior

The pillarless design gives the low roof line an uncluttered and airy feel, and as can be seen by our picture of the open doors, only the 14in high pillar holding the door catches intrudes into the opening, leaving nothing to snag the stockings or the ball gown.

Once seated in the rear on the wonderfully deep-cushioned seats, the belle of the ball could fold down the centre backrest below the rear radio speaker to reveal a storage compartment containing a note pad, pencil, and a bottle of Arpege de Lanvin eau de toilette. Kicking off her shoes she could curl her toes in the thick mouton sheepskin carpets, and stretch out on the leather and fabric seat. If her toes were cold, she could reach down below the seat and open the vent grille to the separate under-seat rear heater, or if she was too warm she could press the separate electric rear window control on the rear armrest and slide down the window for a cooling breeze.

If our belle was more driver than passenger, up front she would find the already mentioned seat memory, previously set for her comfort. In front of her she would see a futuristic dash in keeping with the car's ostentatious exterior, all chrome and lights clustered around a strip speedo topped by the twin peaks of the indicator flashers. At the base of the dash are the comfort controls, to the left of the steering column are the heater and demister levers, while on the right are those for the air-conditioner.

In the centre of the dash, within easy reach, are the controls for the transistorized radio, a world first which, when it was switched on or off, automatically raised or lowered the aerial. Further still to the right is the revolving drum-type clock, unusual but in keeping with the design. Below this, between the his and hers matching ashtrays and cigarette lighters (hidden behind the drop panel which reveals the ashtray) is the glove compartment.

Of course, it is no ordinary glovebox for this extraordinary car, the drop-down lid contains a polished stainless steel mirror, which itself folds up to reveal a beauty compartment. When sold new it contained a special compartment for a box of tissues, a vanity compact and lipstick, a stick cologne (for hubby) and six magnetized stainless-steel cups! This is luxury with a capital 'L'.

Above the windscreen, ready to fold down in the case of excessive sunshine, are translucent, polarized perspex sunvisors. Fortunately intact and unmarked on our car, as these items are irreplaceable.

Should the fortunate couple have young ladies and gentlemen in the back (they could hardly be referred to as mere children), concern for their safety could be alleviated by electrically locking all the doors by depressing the button in the centre of the door-locking lever. Childproof locks in 1957!

If by chance some passing oaf brushed against the left wing mirror, upsetting it, it could be realigned from inside the car without winding down a single window, using the mirror adjustment remote control. How long did the rest of us wait to get this feature on our lowly Commodore?

Lady Luck, or lucky lady?


If you were wondering about the feminine allusions above, there are two reasons for this. The first is the current owner, Lorraine Morris, whose Cadillac collection featured in ACCM last month. She believes her car was imported to Australia in October 1987 by a dealer. A well-known Cadillac enthusiast, she was approached as a potential purchaser for the car, and was able to snap it up for a good price prior to its advertised auction date, causing heartache for at least one other enthusiast, who has fortunately forgiven her.

Lorraine managed to trace the original owner in the USA through the US Cadillac Club, receiving a polite note in reply, on watermarked, embossed (and probably scented) personalised notepaper. Perhaps not too surprisingly, the first owner was the wife of a good-ole Texas oil-man, who struck it rich in the postwar Texas oil boom when he discovered 'black gold' on the family ranch.

Lorraine was later surprised by a 3.00am phone call from a distinctly 'southern-drawl' male voice asking for "Lorraine from Osstralia". When she replied in the affirmative, still half asleep, the voice declared, "I believe you've got ma daddy's car!" Introducing himself as the son of the second owner, he insisted Lorraine go immediately to the car to confirm it was his father's. Protesting (not too strenuously, curiosity getting the better of her), Lorraine went out to the garage searching for a hole in the underside of the front bumper. On returning (thankfully) to bed and curious husband Michael, she confirmed this feature to the caller. "Hell, damn! That's my daddy's car, for sure!", he bellowed."I put that hole there ma self when I got a flat after 'borrowing' daddy's car one night with a couple of friends. We didn't know the bumper was cast alloy, and the durn jack punched a hole straight through it!" It isn't often Lorraine gets 3.00am phone calls, but this one she was (reasonably) happy to receive.

Rare ..... and expensive

Since owning the car, Lorraine and Michael have repaired some of the electrics which were not operating as they should, and given the car a fresh coat of paint in the original colour. The most spectacular thing about Lorraine's Brougham is its absolute originality, and the pristine original condition of all the fittings and fixtures. Even the upholstery and carpets are barely worn, which may be explained by the low 39,000 miles on the odometer, which is believed genuine.

Where Eldorado Broughams are concerned, particularly the rarer 1957 model, missing parts or trim are almost impossible to replace. Thus an original and intact car like Lorraine's commands a premium from collectors way in excess of restored cars, particularly those with non-original replacement parts. This car is to all intents and purposes irreplaceable and almost priceless. I did ask Lorraine if she would consider selling it, (are we paying Walker too much? Ed.) and her immediate reply was a vehement "never!" Pressing her further I got the impression that she might be persuaded by an offer as outrageous as the car itself, so after I win the Lotto, (phew! Ed) Lorraine, expect a call!

By any standards the 1957 Eldorado Brougham is in a class of its own. More expensive than a Lincoln Continental, then the benchmark for opulence, three times the price of a Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud Mk III, and loaded with every bit of electronic and technological know-how Cadillac was able to throw at it. It is a supreme automotive tour-de-force, and I don't care how much they cost, I want one, which is probably the same sentiment expressed by the original owner when he bought it for his young wife. Oh, well! At least I've driven one!

Grateful thanks to Lorraine and Michael Morris; to Peter Ratcliff, and to MotorBooks, Cremorne NSW 02 9909 1144 for research assistance

Specifications

Engine

365cu in (5980cc) 90 degree ohv V8

Bore x stroke

4in x 3.6in (102 x 92mm)

Compression

10.25:1

Bhp @ rpm

325 @ 4800

Torque @ rpm

405ft/lb @3400

Transmission

3-speed auto 'Hydra-Matic'

Suspension

air suspension; front and rear

Brakes

power assisted drums

L x W x H

217 x 78.5 x 55.5in

Wheelbase

126in

Track

61in

Weight

5290lbs (2350kg)

Top speed

120mph (190km/h)

0-60mph

14 secs

Fuel system

electric pump; 2 x 4bbl carbs

Consumption

14mpg

Capacity

20gals

Production

400; semi-hand-built

WFB